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Costa Rican Treaty

Consular Convention between the
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and COSTA RICA

Signed at San Jose January 12, 1948
Ratification advised by the Senate of the United States of America August 17, 1949
Ratified by the President of the United States of America September 2, 1949
Ratified by Costa Rica February 9, 1950
Ratifications exchanged at San Jose February 17, 1950
Proclaimed by the President of the United States of America March 19, 1950
Entered into force March 19, 1950
By THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION
WHEREAS a consular convention between the United States of
America and the Republic of Costa Rica was signed by their respective
plenipotentiaries at San Jose on January 12, 1948, the original
of which convention, in the English and Spanish languages, is word
for word as follows:

The President of the United States of America and the President of the Republic of Costa Rica, on the basis of that traditional friendship which has always joined the peoples of their respective countries, have agreed to conclude a Consular Convention for the purpose yet further to strengthen this happy relationship through the fostering and development of effective consular representation between the two countries, and, in the premises have appointed as their respective plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States of America: Mr. John Willard Carrigan, Charge d'Affaires ad interim of the United States of America;

The President of the Republic of Costa Rica: His Excellency Licenciado Alvaro Bonilla Lara, Secretary of State encharged with the Office of Foreign Relations

who, after having communicated to each other their full powers and having found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following:

ARTICLE I

1.       Each state, agrees to receive from the other state consular representatives in those of its ports, places and cities where it may be convenient to establish consular offices and which are open to consular representatives of any foreign state. It shall be within the discretion of the sending state to determine whether the consular office to which such consular representatives shall be appointed or assigned, shall be a consulate general, consulate, vice consulate or consular agency. The sending state may prescribe the consular district to correspond to each consular office.

2.       A consular officer of the sending state shall, after his official recognition and entrance upon his duties, enjoy in the territory of the receiving state, in addition to the rights, privileges, exemptions and immunities to which he is entitled. by the terms of this convention, the rights, privileges, exemptions and immunities enjoyed by a consular officer of the same grade of the most-favored nation. As an official agent, such officer shall be entitled to the high consideration of all officials, national or local, with whom he has official intercourse in the receiving state.

3.       Upon the appointment or assignment of a consular officer to a post within the territory of the receiving state, the sending state shall notify the receiving state in writing of such appointment or assignment. Such notification shall be accompanied with a request for the issuance to such officer of an exequatur or other formal authorization permitting the exercise of consular duties within the territory of the receiving state. Such request shall not be refused without good cause and the exequatur or authorization shall be issued free of charge and as promptly as possible. When necessary a provisional authorization may be issued pending the issuance of an exequatur or formal authorization.

4.       The receiving state may revoke any exequatur, formal authorization or provisional authorization if the conduct of a consular officer gives serious cause for complaint. The reasons for such revocation shall be furnished to the sending state through diplomatic channels.

5.       (a) The receiving state shall notify the appropriate local authorities of such state of the names of consular officers authorized to act within the receiving state.
(b) A consular officer in charge of a consular office shall keep the authorities of the receiving state informed of the names and addresses of the employees of the consular office. The receiving state shall designate the particular authority to whom such information is to be furnished.

6.       Upon the death, incapacity, or absence of a consular officer having no subordinate consular officer at his post, any other consular officer of the sending state to whom an exequatur, formal authorization or provisional authorization has been issued by the receiving state or any person on the staff of the consular office whose name shall. previously have been made known to the authorities of the receiving state pursuant to paragraph 5 of this article, may temporarily exercise the consular duties of the deceased or incapacitated or absent consular officer, and while so acting shall enjoy all the rights, privileges, exemptions and immunities previously enjoyed by such consular officer.

7.       A consular officer or diplomatic officer of the sending state, who is a national of that state, may have the rank also of a diplomatic officer or of a consular officer, as the case may be, on condition that permission for him to exercise such dual functions has been duly granted by the receiving state and appropriate recognition in a consular capacity has been granted. In any such case such person's rank as a diplomatic officer shall be understood as being superior to and independent of his rank as a consular officer. The exercise of consular duties by any diplomatic officer shall be without prejudice to any additional personal privileges and immunities which might accrue to such officer by reason of his diplomatic status.

ARTICLE II

1.       A consular officer who is a national of the sending state and not engaged in a private occupation for gain in the receiving state, shall be exempt from arrest or prosecution in the receiving state except when charged with the commission of a crime which, upon conviction, might subject the individual guilty thereof to a sentence of imprisonment for a period of one year or more.

2.       A consular officer or employee shall in civil proceedings be subject to the jurisdiction of the courts of the receiving state except in respect of acts performed by him within the scope of his official duties. He shall not however be permitted to assert that an act was performed by him within the scope of his official duties in any case where a third party shall have been injured as the result of negligence, for which the officer or employee would be responsible under local law, or had reason to believe that the officer or employee was acting in his personal capacity.

3.       A consular officer or employee may be required to give testimony in either civil or criminal cases, except as to acts performed by him within the scope of his official duties, or as to any matter cognizable by him only by virtue of his official status, but the court requiring his testimony shall take all reasonable steps to avoid interference with the performance of his official duties. The court requiring the testimony of a consular officer shall, wherever possible or permissible, arrange for the taking of such testimony, orally or in writing, at his residence or office. A court may not require a consular officer or employee to give evidence as expert witness with regard to the laws of the sending state.

4.       A consular officer or employee shall not be required to produce official archives in court or to testify as to their contents.

5.       A consular officer or employee who is a national of the sending state and not a national of the receiving state and is not engaged in a private occupation for gain in the receiving state shall be exempt from military, naval, jury, administrative or police service of any character whatsoever.

6.       (a) The buildings and premises occupied by the sending state for official consular purposes shall not be subject to military billeting or to expropriation, condemnation, confiscation or seizure, except in accordance with the laws governing the condemnation of property for public purposes and in such case only upon prior payment to the sending state of the full value of the property condemned.
(b) All furniture, office equipment and other personal property located in any building occupied for official consular purposes and all vehicles, including aircraft, used in the performance of the official business of the consular office shall not be subject to military requisition or to expropriation, condemnation, confiscation or seizure.

7.       The buildings and premises occupied exclusively as a personal residence by a consular officer or employee who is a national of the sending state and not a national of the receiving state and is not exercising a private occupation for gain in the receiving state shall be afforded comparable protection to that afforded to buildings and premises occupied for official consular purposes, and the personal property of any such consular officer or employee shall be afforded comparable protection to that afforded to the personal property of a comparable nature referred to in subparagraph (b) of paragraph 6 of this article.

ARTICLE III

1.       No tax of any kind shall be levied or assessed in the territory of the receiving state by the receiving state, or by any state, province, municipality, or other local political subdivision thereof, in respect of fees received on behalf of the sending state in compensation for consular services, or in respect of any receipt given for the payment of such fees.

2.       No tax of any kind shall be levied or assessed in the territory
of the receiving state by the receiving state, or by any state, province, municipality, or other local subdivision thereof on the official emoluments, salaries, wages or allowances received as compensation for his consular services by a consular officer of the sending state who is not a national of the receiving state.

3.       The provisions of paragraph 2 of this article also apply to the official emoluments, salaries, wages or allowances received by an employee of the consular office of the sending state who is not a national of the receiving state and whose name has been duly communicated to the appropriate authorities of the receiving state in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 5 of Article I.

4.       A consular officer or employee who is a national of the sending state and is not a national of the receiving state, who is not engaged in a private occupation for gain in the territory of the receiving state and who is the holder of an exequatur or other authorization to perform consular duties or whose name has been duly communicated to the appropriate authorities of the receiving state in accordance with paragraph 5 of Article I shall, except as provided in paragraph 5 of this article, be exempt in the territory of the receiving state from all other taxes levied or assessed by the receiving state, or by any state, province, municipality, or other local political sub-division thereof, including taxes or fees levied or assessed on the use or ownership of any vehicle or vessel, including aircraft, or of any wireless, radio or television set or in respect of the driving or operation of any vehicle or vessel including aircraft.

5.       (a) The provisions of paragraph 4 of this article shall apply only to taxes in respect of which the consular officer or employee would in the absence of the exemption provided by this article be the person legally liable, and shall not apply to taxes in respect of which some other person is legally liable, notwithstanding that the burden of the tax may be passed on to the consular officer or employee. If, however, a consular officer or employee is entitled to income from sources outside the territory of the receiving state, but that income is payable to him, or collected on his behalf, by a banker or other agent within the territory of the receiving state who is required to deduct income tax on payment of the lllcome and to account for the tax so deducted, the consular officer or employee shall be entitled to repayment of the tax so deducted.
(b) The provisions of paragraph 4 of this article shall not apply to:
(1) taxes levied or assessed on the ownership or occupation of immovable property if such property is situated within the territory of the receiving state;
(2) taxes on income derived from property of any kind situated within the territory of the receiving state;
(3) taxes levied or assessed on that part of the estate of a consular officer or employee ,which is exclusive of property used by him in the performance of his official duties.
(c) For the purpose of clause (3) of subparagraph (b) of this paragraph any part of the estate of a deceased consular officer or employee which would otherwise be subject to taxation in the receiving state which does not exceed in value two times the amount of the official emoluments, salaries or allowances received by the consular officer or employee for the year immediately preceding his death, shall be deemed conclusively to constitute property used by him in the performance of his official duties.

ARTICLE IV

1.       All furniture, equipment and supplies intended for official use in a consular office of the sending state shall be permitted entry into the territory of the receiving state free of all customs duties and internal revenue or other taxes whether imposed upon or by reason of importation.

2.       The baggage and effects and other articles imported exclusively for the personal use of consular officers and employees and the members of their respective families and suites, who are nationals of the sending state and are not nationals of the receiving state and who are not engaged in any private occupation for gain in the territory of the receiving state, shall be exempt from all customs duties and internal revenue or other taxes whether imposed by the receiving state, or by any state, province, municipality, or other local political subdivision thereof, upon or by reason of importation. Such exemption shall be granted with respect to property accompanying any person entitled to claim an exemption under this paragraph on first arrival or on any subsequent arrival and with respect to property consigned to any such person during the period the consular officer or employee for or through whom the exemption is claimed, is assigned to or is employed in the receiving state by the sending state. .

3.       It is understood, however, (a) that the exemptions provided by paragraph 2 of this article shall be accorded in respect of employees in a consular office only when the names of such employees have been duly communicated in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 5 of Article 1, to the appropriate authorities of the receiving state; (b) that in the case of the consignments to which paragraph 2 of this article refers, either state may, as a condition to the granting of the exemption provided in this article, require that a notification of any such consignment be given in such manner as it may prescribe; and (c)that nothing therein shall be construed to permit the entry into the territory of either state of any article the importation of which is specifically prohibited by law.

ARTICLE V

1.       The sending state may, in accordance with such conditions as may be prescribed by the laws of the receiving state, acquire by purchase, gift, devise, lease or otherwise, either in its own name or in the name of one or more persons acting on its behalf, the ownership or possession, or both, of lands, buildings and appurtenances located in the territory of the receiving state and required by the sending state for consular purposes. If under the local law the permission of the local authorities must be obtained as a prerequisite to any such acquisition such permission shall be given on application of the sending state.

2.       The sending state shall have the right to erect buildings and appurtenances on land, which is owned or held by or on behalf of the sending state in the territory of the receiving state for consular purposes, subject to compliance with local building, zoning or town-planning regulations applicable to all land in the area in which such property is situated.

3.       No tax of any kind shall be levied or assessed in the territory of the receiving state by the receiving state, or by any state, province, municipality, or other local political subdivision thereof, on the sending state, or on any person acting on its behalf in accordance with paragraph 1 of this article, in respect of lands and buildings or appurtenances owned or held by or on behalf of the sending state for consular purposes except taxes or other assessments levied for services or local public improvements by which the premises are benefited. A building, or part of a building, in which a consular office is situated and the rest of which is used as a consular residence is to be regarded as used exclusively for consular purposes.

4.       No tax of any kind shall be levied or assessed in the territory of the receiving state by the receiving state, or by any state, province, municipality, or other local political sub-division thereof, on the ownership, possession or use of personal property owned or used by the sending state for consular purposes.

ARTICLE VI

1.       A consular officer may place on the outside of the consular office the coat of arms or national device of the sending state with an appropriate inscription designating the office and may fly the flag of the sending state over or by such office. He may also place the coat of arms or national device and display the flag of the sending state on vehicles and vessels, including aircraft, employed by him in the exercise of his consular duties. A consular officer may display the flag of the sending state over or by his residence on the occasions which he considers appropriate.

2.       The quarters where consular business is conducted and the archives of the consular office of the sending state shall at all times be inviolable, and under no pretext shall any of the authorities of the receiving state make any examination or seizure of papers or other property in such quarters or archives. When a consular officer is engaged in business within the territory of the receiving state; the files and documents of the consular office shall be kept in a place entirely separate from the place where private or business papers are kept.

3.       Official consular correspondence shall be inviolable and the local authorities shall not examine or detain any such correspondence.

ARTICLE VII

1.       A consular officer of the sending state, may within his consular district address the authorities of the receiving state, or of any state, province, municipality, or other local political sub-division thereof, for the purpose of protecting the nationals of the sending state in the enjoyment of rights accruing by treaty or otherwise and may register complaints against the infraction of such rights. Failure upon the part of the proper authorities to grant redress or to accord protection may justify interposition through diplomatic channels. In the absence of a diplomatic representative, the principal consular officer stationed at the capital of the receiving state may apply directly to the Government of the receiving state.

2.       (a) A consular officer shall, within his consular district, have the right:
(1) To interview, communicate with, and advise any national of the sending state;
(2) to inquire into any incidents which have occurred affecting the interests of any national of the sending state;
(3) to visit, upon notification to the appropriate authority, and have private access to any national of the sending state who is imprisoned or detained by the authorities of the receiving state; and
(4) to assist any national of the sending state in proceedings before or in relations with the appropriate authorities of the receiving state or of any state, province, municipality, or of any local political subdivision thereof.
(b) A consular officer shall be informed immediately by the appropriate authorities of the receiving state when any national of the sending state is confined in prison awaiting trial or otherwise detained in custody within his consular district by such authorities.

3.       A national of the sending state shall have the right at all times to communicate with a consular officer of the sending state.

ARTICLE VIII

(a) A consular officer of the sending state may within his district:
(1) Authenticate or certify signatures, documents or copies of documents;
(2) prepare, receive, legalize, certify and attest declarations or depositions;
(3) prepare, attest, receive the acknowledgments of, certify, authenticate, legalize and in general, take such action as may be necessary to perfect or to validate any document or instrument of a legal character; and
(4) perform such other analogous services as he is authorized to perform by the laws of the sending state.;
(b) A consular officer may perform the services specified in subparagraph (a) of this article whenever such services are required by a national of the sending state for use outside of the territory of the receiving state or by any person for use in the territory of the sending state or are rendered in accordance with procedures, not prohibited by the laws of the receiving state, established by the sending state for the protection of its nationals abroad or for the proper administration of its laws and regulations.
(c) A consular officer may also, to the extent permitted by the receiving state and in conformity with authority conferred on him by the sending state, perform the services specified in subparagraph (a) of this article in circumstances other than those provided for by subparagraph
(b) of this article whenever the rendition of such services shall be deemed to be necessary or expedient.

ARTICLE IX

  1. (a) Whenever the local authorities of the receiving state shall learn that a national of the sending state died in a locality subject to the jurisdiction of the receiving state and that there is not in the receiving state any person appointed by the decedent as his executor or as the representative of his estate or entitled to claim the whole or any part of the proceeds of the estate as his heir or next of kin or as a beneficiary under his will, such authorities shall advise the nearest consular officer of the sending state of the death of the decedent.
    (b) Whenever the local authorities of the receiving state shall learn that a decedent, irrespective of his nationality or the place of his residence, left in the receiving state property in which a person known to be a national of the sending state has an interest under the 'terms of the decedent's will or in accordance with the appropriate laws of descent and distribution, or in any other manner, the local authorities shall furnish the nearest consular officer of the sending state with such information as may be needed by him to protect the interests of such national.
  2. (a) In any case where a deceased person leaves property in the receiving state and a legal or equitable interest in such property is held or claimed by a national of the sending state, who is not resident in the territory of the receiving state and is not legally represented there by any person, the consular officer of the sending state in whose district the estate of the decedent is being administered or, if no administration has been instituted, the property is situated, shall have the right, except as such right may be limited by Section 3 of this article, to represent such national as regards his interests in the estate or property as if valid powers of attorney had been executed by him in favor of the consular officer. If subsequently such national becomes legally represented in the territory of the receiving state and the consular officer is notified to that effect the position of the consular officer will be as if the powers of attorney had become revoked.
    (b) The provisions of subparagraph (a) of this article apply whatever the nationality of the decedent and irrespective of the place of his death.
    (c) In any case where subparagraph (a) of this article applies, the consular officer shall have the right to take steps for the protection and preservation of the interests of the person whom he is entitled to represent under subparagraph (a). He shall also have the right, in any such case, to take possession of the estate or the property unless other persons, having superior interests, have taken the necessary steps to assume possession thereof. If under the law of the receiving state, a grant or order of a court is necessary for the purpose of permitting the consular officer to exercise the rights which he is entitled to exercise pursuant to this subparagraph such rights shall be recognized by the courts and any grant or order which would have been made in favor of the person whose interests are represented by the consular officer, if he had been present and applied for it, shall be made in favor of the consular officer on his application.
    (d) The consular officer shall be permitted to undertake the full administration of the estate whenever and to the same extent as a person, whose interest he represents under subparagraph (a) of this article, would have had the right to administer the estate if he had been present. If by the law of the receiving state a grant by a court is necessary, the consular officer shall have the right to apply for and to receive a grant to the sall1.e extent as the person he represents would have had, if such person had been present and applied for it. The court may~ however, postpone the making of a grant of administration to the consular officer (with or without the will annexed) for such time as it thinks necessary to enable the person represented by the consular officer to be informed and to decide whether he desires to be represented otherwise than by the consular officer.
  3. A consular officer of the sending state may, on behalf of a national of the sending state who is not a resident of the receiving state, receive for transmission to such a person, through channels prescribed by the sending state, any money or property to which such person is entitled as a consequence of the death of any person. Such money or property may include, but is not limited to, shares in an estate, payments made pursuant to Workmen's Compensation laws, or any similar laws, and the proceeds of life insurance policies. The court, agency or person making the distribution shall not, however, be required to make such distribution through a consular officer. If a court, agency or person does make distribution through a consular officer, it may require him to furnish reasonable -evidence of the receipt of the money or property by the person or persons entitled thereto. The authority vested in a consular officer by this section shall be in addition to and not in limitation of the authority vested in him by previous paragraphs of this article.
  4. Whenever a consular officer shall undertake the full administration of an estate pursuant to subparagraph (d) of paragraph 2 of this article, he subjects himself in his capacity as administrator to the jurisdiction of the court making the appointment for all necessary purposes to the same extent as if he were a national of the receiving state.
  5. The provisions of this article shall be subject to any laws of, or regulations issued pursuant to law by, the receiving state providing for, or relating to, war or a national emergency.

ARTICLE X

(a) A consular officer of the sending state shall, except as herein-after provided, have the right to exercise exclusive jurisdiction over controversies arising out of the internal order of merchant vessels of the sending state and over matters pertaining to the enforcement of discipline on board whenever any such vessels shall have entered the territorial waters of the receiving state within his consular district.
(b) A consular officer of the sending state shall have jurisdiction over issues concerning the adjustment of wages of members of the crews of vessels of the sending state which shall have entered the territorial waters of the receiving state within, his consular district and the execution of contracts relating to such wages. Such jurisdiction shall not in any case, however, exclude the jurisdiction conferred on the competent authorities of the receiving state under existing or future laws.

Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph 1 of this article a consular officer shall not, except as permitted by the laws of the receiving state, exercise jurisdiction in any case involving an offense committed on board a merchant vessel of the sending state, which offense would be punishable under the law of the receiving state by a sentence of imprisonment for a period of at least one year, or by penalties in excess thereof.

A consular officer may/freely invoke the assistance of the competent authorities of the receiving state in any matter pertaining to the maintenance of internal order on board a vessel of the sending state which shall have entered within the territorial waters of the receiving state. Upon the receipt by such authorities of the request of the consular officer the requisite assistance shall be given.

A consular officer, or a consular employee designated by him, may appear with the officers and crews of the vessels of the sending state before the judicial and administrative authorities of the receiving state for the purpose of observing any proceedings affecting such persons and rendering such assistance as may be permitted by the laws of the receiving state.

ARTICLE XI

A consular officer of the sending state shall have the right to inspect within the ports of the receiving state within his consular district, the merchant vessels of any state destined to a port of the sending state in order to enable him to procure the necessary information to prepare and execute such documents as may be required by the laws of the sending state as a condition to the entry of vessels into its ports and to furnish to the competent authorities of the sending state such information with regard to sanitary or other matters as such authorities may require.

In exercising the rights conferred upon him by this article a consular officer shall act with all possible despatch and without unnecessary delay.

ARTICLE XII

All arrangements relative to the salvage of a vessel of the sending state wrecked upon the coasts of the receiving state may, unless the vessel shall have been attached by a salvor, be directed by such person as shall be authorized for such purpose by the law of the sending state and whose identity and authority shall have been made known to the authorities of the receiving state by the consular officer of the sending state within whose consular district the wrecked vessel is found, or, in the absence of any such person, by such consular officer.

Pending the arrival of the consular officer, who shall be informed immediately of the occurrence of the wreck, or of such other person as may be authorized to act in the premises, the authorities of the receiving state shall take all necessary measures for the protection of persons and the preservation of property. Such measures shall, however, be restricted to those necessary for the maintenance of order, the protection of the interests of the salvors and the execution of the arrangements which shall be made for the entry or exportation of the salvaged merchandise. Such merchandise is not to be subjected to any customs or customhouse charges, unless it be intended for consumption in the receiving state.

The intervention of the authorities of the receiving state shall not occasion any expenses except such expenses as may be caused by the operations of salvage and the preservation of the goods saved, or which would be incurred under similar circumstances by vessels of the receiving state.

If a wreck is found within a port, or constitutes a navigational hazard within the territorial waters of the receiving state, there shall also be observed those arrangements which may be ordered by the authorities of the receiving state with a view to avoiding any damage that might otherwise be caused by the wrecked vessel to the port facilities and to other vessels.

ARTICLE XIII

For the purpose of this convention the term "national' shall be deemed to include any natural person juridical entity possessing, as the case may be, the nationality of the receiving or the sending state, and the term "person" shall be deemed to include any natural person or juridical entity.

ARTICLE XIV

The territories of the contracting states to which the provisions of this convention apply shall be understood to comprise all areas of land and water subject to the sovereignty or authority of either state, except the Panama Canal Zone.

The provisions of paragraph 2, Article I, do not confer upon Consular officials and employees of the United States of America those rights, privileges, exemptions, and immunities conferred to Consular officials and employees of one or more of the Republics of EI Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, by virtue of Treaties and other agreements which have been entered into or may be entered into between the Republic of Costa Rica and one or more of the Republics of EI Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.

ARTICLE X

1.       This Convention shall be ratified and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at San Jose, Costa Rica.
The Convention shall take effect in all its provisions the thirtieth day after the day of exchange of ratifications (Entered into force Mar. 19, 1950; see post, p. 32) and shall continue in force for the term of ten years.

2.       If, six months before the expiration of the aforesaid term of ten years, the Government of neither State shall have given notice to the Government of the other State of an intention to modify or terminate any of the provisions of this Convention or to terminate the Convention upon the expiration of the aforesaid term of ten years, the Convention shall continue in force after the aforesaid term and until six months from the date on which the Government of either State shall have given notice to the Government of the other State of an intention to modify or terminate the Convention.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Convention and have hereunto affixed their seals. DONE in duplicate in English and Spanish, in the city of San Jose, this twelfth day of January, 1948.

JOHN WILLARD CARRIGAN
Charge d'Affaires ad Interim
of the United States of America
[SEAL]

ALVARO BONILLA LARA
Secretary of State Encharged
with the Office of Foreign Relations
[SEAL]

WHEREAS the Senate of the United States of America, by the resolution of August 17, 1949, two-thirds of the Senators present concurring therein, did advise and consent to the ratification of the said convention;

WHEREAS the said convention was duly ratified by the President of the United States of America on September 2, 1949, in pursuance of the aforesaid advice and consent of the Senate, and has been duly ratified on the part of the Republic of Costa Rica;

WHEREAS the respective instruments of ratification of the said convention were duly exchanged at San Jose on February 17, 1950;

AND WHEREAS it is provided in Article XV of the said convention that the convention shall take effect ill all its provisions the thirtieth day after the day of exchange of ratifications;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim and make public the said convention to the end that the same and each and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States of America and by the citizens of the United States of America and all other persons subject to the jurisdiction thereof on and after March 19, 1950, the thirtieth day after the day of exchange of ratifications.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the city of Washington this nineteenth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred fifty and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred seventy-fourth.

HARRY S TRUMAN

By the President:
DEAN ACHESON
Secretary of State

 

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